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's in your wallet? here's your invoice. >>> a good saturday afternoon to you. i'm craig melvin coming to you from washington, d.c., where we are covering the president's second inauguration, but today is a day for americans to give something back. that tops our political headlines. the president kicking off the national day of service today volunteering at a school here in the d.c. area. the first family and 500 volunteers joined him. tomorrow president obama will take the oath of office in a private white house ceremony. monday, hundreds of thousands are expected as he takes the oath on the capitol steps. former presidents clinton and carter will be present at that ceremony monday. not attending former president george h.w. bush and his father, former president bush, the younger bush staying at home because his father is sick. the president was just released from the hospital after an extended illness. also today a big development on the debt limit. a vote is scheduled for next week and we'll dig in to those details later in the show. first, though, the stars are coming out for that nationa
picture's on the wall, seven yellow jerseys hanging up there. i talked to the general manager, craig staley, runs mellow johnny's here. he's known lance armstrong since they were teenagers growing up in the dallas, they used to race against each other. for people like craig, the news has been the hardest to handle as they see their friend kind of everything kind of come unraveling around him. he told me he had his suspiciouses for some thyme. but nonetheless, he's seen lance armstrong go through what he's going through this week. even though it's self-inflicted, it is very difficult. have you -- i mean have you lost faith in him? >> no, no. there's still a lot there. you know, there's still a lot of things that he's done and accomplished outside of the seven tour de france. that's everything right now is focused on that. when you take him, the person, look at all of the things he's done, people he's inspired, people he's helped with cancer, there's a much bigger story. i think that part of the story will start to come around. a lot of people are sort of abandoning him quickly. i thin
is going to be margarita and then craig fugate, and after they have both given their remarks, i will gather up your questions, and i'll come up to the podium and ask them some of your questions. we will begin with margarita, the united nations assistant secretary for disaster risk reduction. she has 30 years experience in the field, humanitarian relief, institution building. she has dealt with more disasters of more types, not just environmental, but broadly humanitarian disasters and more than probably anybody else. she has great perspective so if you will come to the podium and when she is finished, i will briefly introduce mr. fugate, and then we'll have his remarks and take questions. thank you. [applause] >> good morning. i must say that i'm really honored and very impressed to have been asked to come and speak to this audience. i know you are a powerful group of scientists. i think a lot of students here today as well, and so we have both the advantage of the crude wisdom and hope for the future here today. the one idea that petermented to come up with after three days work is let it
grove, craig barrett, titans. go back to the steve jobs, talking about the stodgy intel. there's a funny moment where andy grove basically told him to shut up. but there is a sense that intel didn't move fast enough. at one point they're talking about, listen, our battery life will start exceeding the arm. put on your apple hat, all right? they would rather do business with samsung's chip, even though samsung is their biggest competitor, than switch to intel. >> what are we missing? there's uniform negativity here. we'll look back on it at end of this year and say, wait a second, we should have thought of that. >> don't throw that. >> that pc was bad, and they had every right to go out the window. all right, i've calmed down. >> there's no hope? >> anytime you have that budget, you can do it. i like stacy very much. it's a great manufacturer. there's hope. >> okay. >> there's hope. same level of hope. silver lining theory i call it. >> okay. when we come back, a wall street analyst known for being a longtime bear on netflix. and from textbook reynolds to the linked-in for college student
they can't take away from him is his cancer survivorship. >> and for craig staley, a long-time friend, that's what he is he holding on to. armstrong is one of the owners. staley and armstrong have known each other since they were teenagers. >> have you lost faith in him? >> there's still a lot of things that he's done and accomplished outside of the seven tours of france. a lot of people are abandoning him really quickly and i think that -- i think that was in some ways a rush to judgment. because i've known the guy a long time and story's not over and he's not finished. >> reporter: but many of lance armstrong's biggest enemies in the cycling world, and there are many, now must feel that they are looking down on the mountain top on him. >> the anti-doping agency says simply sitting down with an interview would not lift the lifetime ban that he faceses because of the report that came back out in october but they said that he will have to sit down under oath and help investigators understand how all of this happened in the cycling industry but a source close to the situation, aware of what's
's happening here in the u.s., but it is even more acute issue in poor countries around the world. so craig, you've got the microphone in hand so why don't you answer first and then hands the microphone to margareta. >> i think the challenge is, particularly as you see what's going on right now with the funding for sandy, a used to be the assumption of the united states is a big disaster happened it was always easy to get money after the fact. it was almost impossible to get money prior to event occurring. that's not the case anymore. even getting money after a disaster, given the current budget climate is extremely difficult. so i think, again, it comes back to the preponderance of these decisions over time are made at the local level. yet almost everything we're targeting is a national policy. the united states federal policy doesn't dictate a lot of it. we basically use incentives and disincentives through taxes and great fun. but we're real decisions get made is at the local level. what i'm trying to get our flood insurance folks to look at is we've got to quit selling mitigation as a g
craig fugate, the lessons will focus on hurricane katrina, the ongoing drought and earthquake in japan on c-span 3 at 8:30 eastern. on c-span 2 at 9:00 a.m. eastern, a brookings institution conference on innovation and the economy. panelists in the day long event are scheduled to include the presidents and c.e.o.'s of alcoa, procter & gamble and nike. >> he had been talking about this dream he'd had. he talked about it for years, the american dream, and that it had become his dream and he had been in detroit just a few months before and he had talked about, you know, i have a dream that america will some day realize these principles and the declaration of independence. so i think he was just inspired by that moment. >> sunday on "after words" clayborn carson recalls his journey as a civil rights activist participating in the march on washington. it's part of three days of book tv this weekend, monday, featuring authors and books on the inauguration, president obama and martin luther king jr. >> representative mike thompson of california chairs a democratic task force that's examining g
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)